Michael Lacey: Award Winning Mathematician

Michael Lacey’s mathematical and teaching achievements have earned him and his department millions in grants and contracts, multiple fellowships, and numerous awards.

The 1987 University of Illinois Ph.D. graduate, has mentored dozens of students throughout his professional career. These include some of the leading Assistant Professors in the Georgia Tech School of Mathematics. This accomplishment earned him the Georgia Tech National Science Foundation ADVANCE Mentoring Award in the year 2012.

Michael Lacey has maintained a close relationship with the National Science Foundation since he was awarded his first postdoctoral fellowship with them in the year 1990. This close relationship led to him being named the director of National Science Foundation training grants and through these dozens more students have been assisted including having several post-doctoral studies years funded.

The awards granted were the VIGRE and MCTP. Several of the students he mentored from the undergraduate to post-doctoral level have gone on to form post-doctoral relationships with prestigious schools like Yale and Princeton.

Michael Lacey began his professional mathematics career at Louisiana State University and the University of North Carolina at Baton Rouge as an Assistant Professor after graduating from the University of Illinois with a Ph.D. in Mathematics in 1988. His B.S. in Mathematics was received at the University of Texas in 1981.

He joined Indiana University in Bloomington from 1989 to 1996. While his career at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1996 as an untenured Associate Professor, he has now earned the position of Associate Chair for Faculty of the School of Mathematics as well as Full Professorship.

While his work with harmonic analysis has earned him the most recognition and research financing, his post-doctoral research has also focused on ergodic theory and probability. His doctoral thesis that was developed under the guidance of Walter Philipp was on Banach spaces, a completely normed vector.

Harmonic analysis is the representation of functions as basic waves, it’s used in fields such as number theory and quantum mathematics. In 1996, he and mathematician Christoph Thiele earned the Salem Prize for their work with the Hilbert bilinear transform.

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